The Western Australian Curriculum currently encompasses the Australian Curriculum English, mathematics, science and history. Given the phased development of the Australian Curriculum, schools will be teaching some learning areas from the Australian Curriculum supplemented by learning areas described in the former Western Australian Curriculum Framework. As the Australian Curriculum is developed, it will gradually replace the Curriculum Framework.

Western Australian Curriculum and Assessment Outline

The learning areas (and subjects) of the Western Australian curriculum are:

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • Humanities and Social Sciences (including Civics and Citizenship, Economics and Business, Geography, History, Work Studies)
  • Languages
  • The Arts (including Dance, Drama, Media Arts, Music, Visual Arts)
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Technologies (including Design and Technology, Digital Technologies).

 

English Achievement Standard

Receptive modes (listening, reading and viewing)
By the end of Year 3, students understand how content can be organised using different text structures depending on the purpose of the text. They understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are used for different effects.

They read texts that contain varied sentence structures, a range of punctuation conventions, and images that provide additional information. They identify literal and implied meaning connecting ideas in different parts of a text. They select information, ideas and events in texts that relate to their own lives and to other texts. They listen to others' views and respond appropriately.

Productive modes (speaking, writing and creating)
Students understand how language features are used to link and sequence ideas. They understand how language can be used to express feelings and opinions on topics. Their texts include writing and images to express and develop in some detail experiences, events, information, ideas and characters.

Students create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations. They demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and punctuation appropriate to the purpose and context of their writing. They use knowledge of sounds and high frequency words to spell words accurately, checking their work for meaning. They write using joined letters that are accurately formed and consistent in size.

Mathematics Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students recognise the connection between addition and subtraction and solve problems using efficient strategies for multiplication. They model and represent unit fractions. They represent money values in various ways. Students identify symmetry in the environment. They match positions on maps with given information. Students recognise angles in real situations. They interpret and compare data displays.

Students count to and from 10 000. They classify numbers as either odd or even. They recall addition and multiplication facts for single digit numbers. Students correctly count out change from financial transactions. They continue number patterns involving addition and subtraction. Students use metric units for length, mass and capacity. They tell time to the nearest minute. Students make models of three-dimensional objects. Students conduct chance experiments and list possible outcomes. They carry out simple data investigations for categorical variables.

History Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students explain how communities changed in the past. They describe the experiences of an individual or group. They identify events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present.

Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order, with reference to key dates. They pose questions about the past and locate information from sources (written, physical, visual, oral) to answer these questions. Students develop texts, including narratives, using terms denoting time.

Science Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 3, students use their understanding of the movement of the Earth, materials and the behaviour of heat to suggest explanations for everyday observations They describe features common to living things. They describe how they can use science investigations to respond to questions and identify where people use science knowledge in their lives.

Students use their experiences to pose questions and predict the outcomes of investigations. They make formal measurements and follow procedures to collect and present observations in a way that helps to answer the investigation questions. Students suggest possible reasons for their findings. They describe how safety and fairness were considered in their investigations. They use diagrams and other representations to communicate their ideas.